• Erik

    I wish Pittsburgh would have been on the list for a team. it would give us something to do when its baseball season

    • GeeWhiz

      What? The Power doesn’t get you all tingly inside now that their season started? (It did?) Too bad I can’t name one player on the team or stay awake during a game for longer than 5 min. The commercials are cute though.

      • Bobzilla

        Billy Stall…
        Wonder if even his devoted parents can bear to watch?

  • Mike from Boston

    If the USFL becomes a true minor league system, yes the college football aspect is a huge factor, but I’m also curious about the flip side of the coin: the call-up/send-down system, if they plan on adopting one akin to the MLB.

    The Indianapolis Colts could call-up minor league QBs when their marquee guy goes down, leaving them with even less excuses for their total lack of depth at the position.

    Maybe Santonio Holmes could learn what “team player” means in Omaha.

    Maybe Tim Tebow could learn how to throw a forward pass in Akron or Sacramento.

    • Bobzilla

      Maybe Peyton Manning could rehab his neck “down on the farm.”

      There won’t be any call-ups or send-downs as long as the league plays in the spring.
      Tim Tebow would be a perfect candidate for this proposed league. There are too many players not learning how to play professional football at the college level. College players are learning how to play football one way and one way only: Their coach’s way, which doesn’t always prepare them for the pro ranks. Tebow is a perfect example of that.

      • Mike V

        Exactly!!!!

        College football is more different from the professional game today as it has ever been. Teams are forced to take chances on guys like Tebow hoping he will show some level of professional ability.

        Train the guys in a minor league and find out who can play professionally or not. It will make the NFL a better product.

        • Bobzilla

          And God knows (even if Goodell doesn’t) that the NFL truly needs to become a better product. I’ve never, ever seen the NFL worse than what it is right now. Bad players, bad teams, bad officiating, bad ownership and bad character in coaches.
          I find it fascinating that two coaches from Bill Parcell’s coaching tree (Belichick and Payton) have been involved in the two worst scandals in NFL history. Yet Goodell says he has no problem with Parcells coaching the Saints…
          What a league!!!
          What a commissioner!!!

          • Mike V

            I wouldn’t say the league is bad. It is more popular than ever so the product itself is being purchased at a high level.

            I would say the league is very vanilla. Vanilla players and teams. Rules that make the game vanilla. Owners are worse than bad. The coaches aren’t necessarily bad character guys as much as the live a childish life.

            Personally, I gloss over most games other than the Steelers. If you see on NFL game, you have seen them all in these days. That’s my problem with the NFL…it is all the same thing. When everything becomes the same, there is no differentiation between one game and the next. When that happens, there is no reason to watch games beyond a person’s favorite team so eventually, the popularity will dip.

            A minor league of some sort would be the best thing for a team like the Steelers because they evaluate talent so well. It would allow them to evaluate players in a professional league before signing them.

          • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

            That’s why I’ve always rooted for the unconventional quarterbacks….Flutie…Stewart etc. I liked athletic QBs like RGIII long before they were cool. They break up the monotony. Coaches are finding ways to use them effectively but they’re still too much in love with the dinking and dunking.

          • Mike V

            I’d take every team having a “featured runningback” rushing for at least 100 yards per game. That’s not even asking for very much.

          • Bobzilla

            Mike: The league is hardly “more popular than ever.” Jacksonville, Tampa Bay, Oakland, Buffalo, San Diego and Miami can’t give tickets away. People in those cities are smart enough to stay away because the product that Goodell is selling stinks.
            Even Denver had trouble selling tickets, until the ESPN-hyped Tebowmania caused interest, which was so intense, Tebow was sent packing and replaced by Manning.
            The Steelers have won two Super Bowls since 2005, against the Seahawks and the Cardinals. There was a time when such generic teams would never have even qualified for the postseason let alone advance to a Super Bowl.
            In 2011, nearly every playoff team was generic, including the Super Bowl-winning Giants. The Steelers, Broncos, Patriots and Bengals were, in my opinion, playoff frauds. Each of those teams played ridiculously easy schedules, which allowed all of them to reach the postseason.
            The league is bad.
            And only getting worse.

          • Mike V

            I don’t disagree that the product isn’t very good right now. That doesn’t mean it isn’t popular…Watch any of the crappy sitcoms on TV that get huge ratings?

            A product can be bad and popular. The problem with that product is it doesn’t take long for the consumers to realize they are watching/buying crap. This is the danger zone the NFL is in right now.

          • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

            It’s not bad –just not as good as it could or should be. Increasing the number of touchbacks sure didn’t make the product better.

          • Dan

            Should he just arbitrarily find Parcells guilty by association and not let him coach in the NFL ever again?

          • Bobzilla

            Obviously both Payton and Belichick learned from the knee of their master. To answer your question: Yes.

            Getting back to the product: Remember when the Steelers destroyed the Eagles last preseason? That meaningless win sent everyone predicting the Steelers ‘ offense was going to be unstoppable, score at will, and was going to be the best offense in franchise history. Turns out, false alarm.
            The Steelers since 2005 have qualified for three Super Bowls with offenses that couldn’t crack an egg. They have a quarterback who is treated like an all-time great, even though he’s mostly pretty damn average.
            When it comes to the NFL, we are all living in a pretend world, fueled by the great marketing skills of ESPN and every local TV station, radio station and newspaper in America.
            I watch the NFL intently.
            The reason is simple: I’m hooked.
            But just because I’m addicted, that doesn’t mean I have to like it.

  • Bobzilla

    Oh, boy…
    More football.
    More players.
    More concussions.
    More head trauma.
    More law suits.
    More whining by the bleeding hearts.

  • Deuce

    if this indeed true and does serve as a minor league system for the NFL instead of the free and illegal one that’s disguised in the form of college football then it would solve 100% of the corruption in college football…not just 90%.

  • Lumpy Rutherford

    Could you imagine REAL students playing in the Alabama/Auburn game??

    • Tim

      Did you know that Alabama FOOTBALL players graduate at a better rate than the OVERALL STUDENT BODY by a 69% to a 66% rate?

      http://www.rollbamaroll.com/2011/10/25/2513734/alabama-football-basketball-graduation-success-rates

      http://collegeapps.about.com/od/collegeprofiles/p/u-alabama.htm

      • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

        Graduation rates are meaningless….unless they’re low. I knew guys in the 70s who were getting tests that they were to take at noon passed under their dorm room door at 8 in the morning. I knew a guy who literally never opened a book –I was there the day he brought his free books home up in a shopping bag and the bag stayed in the place where he dropped it for 3 months. He never took a book out of the bag and he made the dean’s list despite going to the beach with me and my friends every day. I think things are worse now.Since then I have never paid attention to good graduation rates. If the rates are poor that might just mean that school isn’t cheating enough.

    • Dan

      Yea, it’s called the Harvard-Yale game.

      • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

        Army-Navy

    • http://wayo72.blogspot.com Tony D

      Or anywhere in the SEC for that matter.

  • http://wayo72.blogspot.com Tony D

    Maybe I’m wrong, but I think the USFL will be made up of guys on the fringe of the NFL. I doubt kids will bypass college and go straight to the USFL.

    • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

      Depends on the money. If (huge if) they do it the way it’s done in baseball and hockey, kids would be drafted and assigned to a USFL team for development. Kids should have the option of turning pro out of high school. Just like baseball and hockey. Their SAT scores should not be related to their ability to become pro football players.

      • Dan

        I like the idea, but would you have the USFL have an age limit like in junior hockey? If they capped the age at 23 you’d have a true minor league and something to compete with the NCAA because 18-year-olds would be able to get on the field and they wouldn’t be playing against mostly grown men. I think the USFL does this aggressively if it’s going to survive. Otherwise the rosters are made up of guys in their 30’s in the twilight of their careers. Football is a young man’s game and most of the best players in the NFL are under 27. I know one thing, I wouldn’t watch a second of a USFL game if it was mostly made up of guys like Chris Weinke, Jeff Garcia, and James Farrior.

  • RKR

    Maybe I missed it but I did not see anything regarding the age of the players. I wonder if they would use the same rule as the NFL – 3 years out of high school?

    I’d be all for letting players go directly from high school to the USFL. Why force someone go to college who doesn’t want to be a student?

    RKR

    • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

      Football and basketball should be just like hockey. A kid’s ability to understand Chaucer or trigonometry should have nothing to do with his ability to become a pro athlete. Colleges will hate the USFL and do everything possible to make it fail.

      • RKR

        Would it really make the college game worse? Yes, there would be many players that opt out of college, but I think the overall experience for a college football fan would be about the same.

        A team like the Georgia Bulldogs is a way of like in their area. They would still attract the top tier of players not in the USFL. Would a team in Memphis change this?

        Same for many other college football powerhouses, OSU, OU, Texas, USC, etc, etc, etc…

        I may actually FORCE the NCAA to adopt a playoff system…

        RKR

      • RKR

        Would the overall quality of NCAA football go up? I’m guessing there would be a high percentage of players staying in college for all four years. I have two reasons for this thought:

        1. They are at school because they realise the importance of a college degree. They will stay and get that degree.

        2. Many of the “top flight” talent, looking to make it to the NFL will be in the USFL and would most likely make up the majority of the players taken in the first 3 rounds of the draft. No incentive to come out early.

        With more players being in the same system for a full four years, their development as a team should be more advanced.

        RKR

        • Cambot

          College should not be about sports, it should be about education.

          • RKR

            Cambot,

            There was a big movement in higher education in the 1930’s to get sports out of the colleges. Universities like the University of Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh either disbanded or deemphasized their athletic programs. That’s why the University of Chicago DROPPED football altogether.

            At Pitt, the change in philosophy killed the football program. At the time Pitt was the king of college football. They won national championships in ’29, ’31, ’34, ’36, and ’37. The president at the time changed the academic requirements for athletes, leading eventually to Jock Sutherland leaving. After that, Pitt was basically irrelevant until the late 1970’s.

            Guess what killed that spike? Yep, another president that thought the focus should not be on sports, but education. Pitt has yet to fully recover from that.

            I’m not saying I disagree, but I find the history of sport in higher education – and the tension between the two – to be very interesting.

            RKR

          • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

            There were several future doctors, dentists and attorneys on Pitt’s 9-1 1963 team. That’s almost 50 years ago. I remember when kids went to play football at Pitt because of the dental school. How many doctors, dentists and attorneys have been produced in the last 40 years?

          • Iron Mike

            Not that I disagree…but we are discussing reality, not theory. College football programs are supposed to follow the NCAA rules, but how many times are we reminded that they don’t?

      • Tim

        Tv networks will hate the USFL and will want it to fail. They didn’t pay billions of dollars for TV rights to college games only to have a rival league scoop up the best talent.

  • Erik

    I wonder if this will kill Arena football

  • ISteve Roissy

    USFL? ‘member that Mike Rozier & Cliff Stout with the snowballs n’at? Good times.

  • Cambot

    I think the idea has merit but it remains to be seen whether it will truly prove to be “the solution to 90% of the corruption in college football.” Still it’s a step in the right direction.

    • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

      If done properly it would mean colleges would get back to accepting only kids who predict an ability to do college work. Huge if.

      • Dan

        Watch this make it worse. First, most kids probably would rather go to college anyways and be kings of a campus for three or four years. Second, going to college means not playing against guys twice your size when you’re 18 and they’re 28. Then you have the fact that the NCAA isn’t going to lose anyone to the USFL it truly doesn’t want to lose – they have more resources and more ways to bend the rules even further than they already are. What kid is going to be better served developing his game on a USFL bench at 18 19 and 20 versus actually getting on the field in college?

        A couple kids may make a couple dollars, but they’re not going to make anything close to the money NFL players get. There’s no comparable ticket gate, no billion-dollar broadcast contract, no real insatiable desire for more mediocre football. The best thing about the proposal is actually putting the teams in cities where people might show up.

        I don’t really see how this is going to change anything because a scholarship that leads to a cheap or free degree with a few years of partying and glory along the way is still much more attractive than sitting on a bench in some two-bit town with no fame, notoriety, of safety net in case you get hurt. But I’m open to hearing your side of the logic.

        • http://justwatchthegame.com John Steigerwald

          I give it a 5% chance of becoming a real minor league system for the NFL. I like it because it’s a step in the right direction, but I also like it because it will further expose what a joke college football has become.

        • ISteve Roissy

          To paraphrase – 33 year old chainsmoking real estate agents at the Holiday Inn bar in Sioux Falls do not equal 18 year old naive co-eds on campus in Alabama looking to get back at daddy.

          • Dan

            Steve, you summed it up perfectly. Fabulous!